Readers Write

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Author Adam Oster  has posted a review of Steeple in the Distance on his website. Here is the link. Be sure to prowl his site while you are there. He has much to offer.

Book Review: Steeple in the Distance by Deborah Ude

“I have been rereading your Steeple in the Distance,
stayed up until midnight to finish, Deb you are amazing,
I truly mean that, all the detail you put into the book is just
a joy to read, noticed a few new things as I read it again,
this will be a book I read and read again. ” Jeanne Wendland

“Well done, Well done!!! I loved it. My tears flowed freely in many spots and I could visualize Nan and her chickens. The butchering, the laundry, the canning, the WORK involved with living made me tired!! So spoiled are we in our heated houses with the grocery stores a mile up the road!

It is a compelling book an definitely deserves a larger audience. This is well written and thorough. It is well thought out and flows smoothly. I thoroughly enjoyed the read and have had a difficult time putting it down to do my housework these past 2 days.

Thank You So much. I look forward to the sequel!”
Lois Heinze Walters

“I finished the book and am very impressed with your gift of writing Deb! It was very kind of you to share it with me, and I finished it in four relaxing evenings. You are skilled in choosing the precise words to create a mood and “make a movie in a reader’s mind”, which is a craft that does not come easily for most people.

Your “voice” is very clear and your passion for your characters comes through, and kept me wondering what would happen next. Your historical fiction piece is one that many fans of this genre would enjoy, and held my attention with my Wisconsin connections.”
Karen Steward

“This is a book that should be read slowly, and if possible, out loud to let the descriptive phrases that Debi uses resonate in the ear and then reverberate into the reader’s heart.” Ruth Bernthal (See complete comment below.)

“Often a writer’s opinion comes across as very black and white: staying home is either a lifelong burden or it’s the only real path for women to find meaning in their lives. Thanks for tackling a difficult subject with grace and good writing.” Vanessa Ude  (See complete comment below.)

“Debi paints such vivid pictures that you feel like you are there. I wanted to be in the “summer room” with all those delicious fruits and vegetables. I could almost smell the fresh baked pies and goodies.” Becky Rodebaugh (See complete comment below.)

Your characters are very real. Your developing of “falling in love” is discreet but really comes through. Also, the days following the wedding. Dorothy Lau (Complete comment is posted below.)

To share your impressions scroll down to the comment box. Positive, negative, indifferent, feel free to share!

 

 

 

 

Comments

Ruth Bernthal says:

This is a book that should be read slowly, and if possible, out loud to let the descriptive phrases that Debi uses resonate in the ear and then reverberate into the reader’s heart. I am impressed at how observant she has been to the world around her, i.e. Elsa and Seth’s evening at the willow pond with the encounters with the rabbit, the snake, the song of the frogs, the bats and the fox. Again the September wedding morning when Nan went down to the lake to fish and I quote a favorite paragraph here: “The trees waved with the first of the cool fall breezes, their leaves rustling excitedly together. Nan wondered what secret they were passing, leaf to leaf and tree to tree. Perhaps, she reasoned, they whispered not secrets but rather hymns of praise. Perhaps they invited her to join them. The morning was too sacred to mar with her own attempt. She was content to listen.” Marvelous! Debi has the gift to create and mold believable and distinct characters in her novel. They had real life actions, feelings, and conversations. Now that is a gift. I shed a few tears at the death of Oma and Paul–not too many books evoke such deep emotions from me! Well done, I would classify the writing in the same family as the Little House books of Laura Ingalls Wilder, or Caddie Woodlawn, or Anne of Green Gables. Thanks for writing and publishing it!

Vanessa Ude says:

I thought Nan’s statement in her essay about her college decision was very well done. It’s something I’ve read about often elsewhere,to not treat a woman’s decision to stay home and not pursue a career as a step backwards. For some, it’s simply a personal choice about what makes them feel happy and most fulfilled. Often a writer’s opinion comes across as very black and white: staying home is either a lifelong burden or it’s the only real path for women to find meaning in their lives. Thanks for tackling a difficult subject with grace and good writing.

Becky Rodebaugh says:

This book reminds me of the Little House books that I grew up enjoying so much. I think it is an easy read for any age. Seldom do you find books today centered around faith, family, and the blessings of hard work. Debi paints such vivid pictures that you feel like you are there. I wanted to be in the “summer room” with all those delicious fruits and vegetables. I could almost smell the fresh baked pies and goodies. Nan’s pain upon the memory of her mother was very real. I could sense the turmoil that the war brought. And I was thankful for always being directed back to the steeple in the distance. Thank you for sharing this book with us!

DorothyLau says:

Having known you,Debbie, as a babysitter for our children on Rudolph Rd and when I was your parttime teacher, I could see much potential in you. You had more imagination than the teacher.

Your wide range knowledge of farm life and homemaking is a wonder. Many things were done as when I was a child, helping indoors and out on our farm. Examples; using a rag instead of a dishcloth. The difficulty of ironing a dress shirt- heating the iron on the stove.

Your characters are very real. Your developing of “falling in love” is discreet but really comes through. Also, the days following the wedding.

It took me a long time to read as I tire easily and always wanted to “save and savor” more for the next day.

There were too many “sniffs” on pp. 222 and 223. At a different section, too many “rolling of eyes.” But, a book to enjoy by any Christian. More to come? Dorothy Lau

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